Introduction

Monitoring WSUS updates on Microsoft Windows Server is critical to ensure you get alerted when your systems need to be patched. The process to update Windows Updates on high priority servers implies proper planning to ensure no post-installation problems. If we could trust Microsoft patches for 100 %, installing WSUS updates on a system would be done the moment a maintenance schedule could be created for this system. Unfortunately in my personal experience, WSUS updates are more a cause of problems instead of a solution. That’s why we prefer to not install them too fast, as you might experience major issues with your production systems or with the software that is running on it. A recent example, a colleague accidentally patched some production SharePoint servers, which prohibited the creation of new sitecollections and caused issues with some icons. The only solution was to restore a backup…

Ideally the updates would first need to get tested on QA systems. If the QA servers are running for some times without issues, the production systems can get patched. The above is one of the reasons I spent some time combining the best features from the available Windows Update plugins on the Nagios Exchange.
Such as Christian Kaufmann’s idea to cache the list of Windows Updates into a file. This results in a much lower performance impact of the plugin on the servers you are monitoring. If you have any experience with WSUS updates, you will have noticed that the ‘TrustedInstaller.exe” process which is a MS Windows system process that takes care of querying the WSUS server and installing updates if requested. 

The plugin will count all available WSUS updates and output the count in every possible state. However it will only alert in case a set number of days have passed since the last successful update was installed. By using this method, you can then define a policy and agree to patch all systems which had no updates for a certain time. You could use different policies for QA and PR (production) systems to prevent problems. 

WSUS

 

Details

Some things you need to know about Windows Updates. Microsoft saves the date of the ‘last successful update’ in the registry. The location of the String Value is:

This date however is saved in the Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) or the Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) format. My plugin will try to translate this time to the local time format with the help of a function called Get-LocalTime. This function uses the [System.TimeZoneInfo] .NET class which is only usable if you have .NET 3.5 or higher. So keep in mind the ‘Last Successful Update’ date is in UTC format for servers where .NET 3.5 or higher is not installed.

The plugin will also check this registry key:

And give a warning if the system has a required reboot pending.

PSWindowsUpdate

Starting from Windows 10, Microsoft apparently decided to no longer make use of the above registry key. The only way I found to retrieve the last successful update date and time is with the help of the PSWindowsUpdate module. So I added another argument which allows you to select a different method named ‘PSWindowsUpdate’ to retrieve the necessary information. Please not that the default method is still the original method, I called ‘UpdateSearcher”

In order for this method to work, you will need to install the PSWindowsUpdate module in this location: C:\Windows\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\Modules. If you are using Powershell 5 you can just do:

I’ve included the 1.5.1.11 and 1.5.2 version of the module in the GitHub repository. Or you can download it on the Microsoft Script Center Repository.

How to monitor your WSUS updates?

  1. Please note that the default DaysBeforeWarning and DaysBeforeCritical parameters are set to 120 and 150. Feel free to adjust them as required or pass them as an argument.
  2. Put the script in the NSClient++ scripts folder, preferably in a subfolder Powershell.
  3. In the nsclient.ini configuration file, define the script like this:
  4. Make a command in Nagios like this:
  5. Configure your service in Nagios. Make use of the above created command. Configure something similar like this as $ARG1$:
    QA servers =>

    PR servers =>

  6. If you want to make use of the new ‘PSWindowsUpdate’ method you will need to have an argument like this:

(Almost) Final words

So why did I create another pluging to check WSUS updates? Because I’m using a system which completely automates Windows Update installation with the help of Nagios XI and Rundeck. The existing plugins did not meet my requirements.

Please note that there are several known issues with WSUS on some operating systems. It’s recommended to always update to the latest ‘Windows Update Client’. Please check Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2 update history for more information. More specific, when using WIndows Server 2012 R2, you will really want the following KB’s:

  • KB3172614 => “July 2016 update rollup for Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2”
  • KB3179574 => “August 2016 update rollup for Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2”
  • KB3185279 => “September 2016 update rollup for Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2”

When you don’t have these update rollup’s, checking  for updates and updating your Windows 2012 R2 systems could go very slow. In our case an update check could take up to 40 minutes instead of 10 seconds. 

Let me know on the Nagios Exchange what you think of my plugin by rating it or submitting a review. Please also consider starring the project on GitHub.

Willem D'Haese
Expert Monitoring at Digipolis
Expert Monitoring with a demonstrated history of working in the information technology and services industry. Strong ICT skills such as monitoring, virtualization, automation.