Monitoring NetApp Ontap

Introduction

There are of course numerous way to monitor your NetApp Ontap storage, but this post focusses for now on how to achieve quality monitoring with the help of a Nagios plugin, which was originally developed by John Murphy. The plugin definitely has some flaws, so all help is welcome to improve it. Read the post about debugging Perl scripts, make a fork of the project on Github and start experimenting.

The plugin is able monitor multiple critical NetApp Ontap components, from disk to aggregates to volumes. It can also alert you if it finds any unhealthy components.

NetApp Ontap Logical View

How to monitor Netapp Ontap with Nagios?

  • Download the latest release from GitHub to a temp directory and then navigate to it.
  • Copy the contents of NetApp/* to your /usr/lib/perl5 or /usr/lib64/perl5 directory to install the required version of the NetApp Perl SDK. (confirmed to work with SDK 5.1 and 5.2)
  • Copy check_netapp_ontap.pl script to your nagios libexec folder and configure the correct permissions

Parameters:

–hostname, -H => Hostname or address of the cluster administrative interface.

–node, -n => Name of a vhost or cluster-node to restrict this query to.

–user, -u => Username of a Netapp Ontapi enabled user.

–password, -p => Password for the netapp Ontapi enabled user.

–option, -o => The name of the option you want to check. See the option and threshold list at the bottom of this help text.

–warning, -w => A custom warning threshold value. See the option and threshold list at the bottom of this help text.

–critical, -c => A custom warning threshold value. See the option and threshold list at the bottom of this help text.

–modifier, -m => This modifier is used to set an inclusive or exclusive filter on what you want to monitor.

–help, -h => Display this help text.

Option list:

volume_health:

Check the space and inode health of a vServer volume on a NetApp Ontap cluster. If space % and space in *B are both defined the smaller value of the two will be used when deciding if the volume is in a warning or critical state. This allows you to accomodate large volume monitoring better. thresh: space % used, space in *B (i.e MB) remaining, inode count remaining, inode % used (Usage example: 80%i), “offline” keyword node: The node option restricts this check by vserver name.

aggregate_health:

Check the space and inode health of a cluster aggregate on a NetApp Ontap cluster. If space % and space in *B are both defined the smaller value of the two will be used when deciding if the volume is in a warning or critical state. This allows you to better accomodate large aggregate monitoring. thresh: space % used, space in *B (i.e MB) remaining, inode count remaining, inode % used (Usage example: 80%i), “offline” keyword, “is-home” keyword node: The node option restricts this check by cluster-node name.

snapshot_health:

Check the space and inode health of a vServer snapshot. If space % and space in *B are both defined the smaller value of the two will be used when deciding if the volume is in a warning or critical state. This allows you to better accomodate large snapshot monitoring. thresh: space % used, space in *B (i.e MB) remaining, inode count remaining, inode % used (Usage example: 80%i), “offline” keyword node: The node option restricts this check by vserver name.

quota_health:

Check that the space and file thresholds have not been crossed on a quota. thresh: N/A storage defined. node: The node option restricts this check by vserver name. snapmirror_health: Check the lag time and health flag of the snapmirror relationships. thresh: snapmirror lag time (valid intervals are s, m, h, d). node: The node options restricts this check by snapmirror destination cluster-node name.

filer_hardware_health:

Check the environment hardware health of the filers (fan, psu, temperature, battery). thresh: component name (fan, psu, temperature, battery). There is no default alert level they MUST be defined. node: The node option restricts this check by cluster-node name. port_health: Checks the state of a physical network port. thresh: N/A not customizable. node: The node option restricts this check by cluster-node name.

interface_health desc:

Check that a LIF is in the correctly configured state and that it is on its home node and port. Additionally checks the state of a physical port. thresh: N/A not customizable. node: The node option restricts this check by vserver name.

netapp_alarms:

Check for Netapp console alarms. thresh: N/A not customizable. node: The node option restricts this check by cluster-node name. cluster_health desc: Check the cluster disks for failure or other potentially undesirable states. thresh: N/A not customizable. node: The node option restricts this check by cluster-node name. disk_health: Check the health of the disks in the cluster. thresh: Not customizable yet. node: The node option restricts this check by cluster-node name. For keyword thresholds, if you want to ignore alerts for that particular keyword you set it at the same threshold that the alert defaults to.  

Willem D'Haese
Expert Monitoring at Digipolis
Expert Monitoring with a demonstrated history of working in the information technology and services industry. Strong ICT skills such as monitoring, virtualization, automation.

2 Comments

  1. Is there a way to see what kind of information is coming back from the NetApp when the checks are considered OK? This would help me determine what to set some of the thresholds for and basic troubleshooting. Also I am trying to figure out how to keep from having a couple network ports reported as being down when they are not being used. I would also like to be able to exclude the root aggregate on a aggregate health check. Any help would be great.

Comments are closed.